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Conrail B23-7 #1928 - Atlas

Purchased: November 2017
DCC: Yes
Decoder Type: DN163A0
Sound: No

Details: 

Model Information: The Atlas B23-7 was first released in October of 2000. It shares a mechanism with the B30-7 which was released the following year (2001). The B36-7 also shares the same mechanism. The shells of the B23-7 and B30-7 are very very similar and only differ in some minor details. This is a "modern" mechanism with a split-frame, all-metal chassis, 5-pole / skew-wound motor with dual flywheels, low-friction drive, bi-directional LED lighting, all-wheel drive and pickup (no traction tires), blackened / low-profile wheels, shell-mounted Accumate couplers, and all-plastic gearing.

Starting with the 2005 production run, these models were upgraded to include "scale speed" motors and golden-white lighting. 


Features:

Directional lighting

Painted safety rails

Blackened metal wheels

Cab sunshades

Dual flywheel equipped 5-pole skewed armature motor with a low friction mechanism


Appropriate by railroad:

Fat or thin anticlimber, knuckle or button battery boxes, FB-2, AAR or Blomberg trucks, low or high nose, flat or protruding headlight, 2 or 4 window cab. 


Prototype Description: General Electric's "Dash 7" locomotive line was introduced as a replacement for the older "Universal-Series" of the 60s and early 70s. "Dash 7" series improvements included increased fuel efficiency, tractive effort and reliability. The B23-7 was a direct replacement for the 2,250HP U23B model. The first units were produced for Conrail in September, 1977 (ironically, 3 months after the last U23B was delivered to Conrail). Production continued through 1984, with a total of 535 units built. Conrail was the largest purchaser of the model, with a total fleet of 141 units. 

Several features distinguished B23-7s from predecessor models. The long hood stepped outward in the area of the exhaust stack to accommodate a relocated oil cooler. In addition, the frame was 2 feet longer than that of the U23B. An FB-2 style truck was offered as standard equipment on B23-7s, but some railroads opted to use ?trade-in? trucks. Therefore, AAR type B and Blomberg trucks could be found on some models. The six power assembly doors (located near the center of the long hood) indicated that the B23-7 was powered by a 12-cylinder GE FDL engine. 


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Marc Pelletier,
Mar 14, 2018, 4:19 AM
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